Instructor: Steve Gonzales
School: Jefferson
School year: 2008-09
Course number: 1109JD2
Course title: Jefferson Dancers S2
Subject: Fine and Performing Arts
Grade level(s): 9, 10, 11, 12
Credits: 1
Course description:
Performance ensembles and companies are comprised of experienced students who are committed to performing throughout the Portland Metropolitan area and beyond. Student schedules are designed on an individual basis. All students are expected to take three contrasting dance styles.
THE JEFFERSON DANCERS:
This performing ensemble is a select group of our school’s most advanced dancers. Intensive work, intended for the career-oriented dancer, includes continued training and frequent performances in all dance styles. Students will work with local, nationally and internationally recognized choreographers and directors. Students must make a one-year commitment and meet the district’s extracurricular activities standards.
Prerequisites:
Advance class status and approval of artistic director and department leadership:
By Audition Only
Priority standards:
N/A
Schedule of topics/units covered:
Learning objectives:
Because of the vast body of possible knowledge and skill that this art form offers, students will attend to both breadth and depth of these instructional objectives established by continuing teacher choices about content (creation, performance, history, analysis) and levels of engagement by students (deep, simple, complex and casual).
·To understand elements, principles and processes in dance, while developing the working knowledge of the movement vocabulary and technique of ballet dance.
·Increase knowledge and awareness of proper body alignment and body-part articulation.
·Increase stamina, strength, coordination, agility and flexibility.
·Develop an awareness of the body as an expressive tool, with attention to individual style.
·Develop original movement patterns using basic choreographic principles.
·Identify and demonstrate longer and more complex steps and patterns from two different styles or traditions.
·Demonstrate rhythmic acuity.
·Demonstrate projection while performing dance skills.
·To interpret works from various historical periods, cultures, and peoples analyzing the contexts in which they were created, the characteristics of the works, and the range of possible interpretations.
·To understand the role dance plays in society and the ways in which dance empowers people to create works that manifest their beliefs, social relationships, values and skills.
·To recognize the significance of experiences with dance and reflect on the performance and/or creation of an artistic work.
·To examine how an artistic work affects an audience, and relate audience responses to the artist’s/performer’s creative choices.
·To examine dance performances from functional and structural/formal perspectives, using defensible criteria and communicating effectively through writing, speaking and expressive media.
·To communicate conceptions of what is artistically valid or valued.
·To rehearse and publicly perform dance works in a group or as a soloist.
·To choreograph and perform a solo incorporating events that happen throughout the year.
·Learn to write a resume.
Academic vocabulary:
N/A
District adopted materials:
None
Supplemental resources:
References, text book(s), resources:
By providing a professional dance company environment these students begin to understand the responsibility to their role and the rewards of contributing to a product of exceptional quality. Dance magazine and Dance Sprit magazine articles specifically geared toward dance companies. Dance videos – ABT, Alvin Ailey, New York City Ballet, Hubbard Street, Dance In America, Bill T. Jones, Martha Graham, MOMIX Dance Theatre, Ballet Hispanico, Alonzo King, etc….Students have the opportunity to study with world-renowned artists, in residency programs, and to audition for post secondary schools and colleges. In addition, they have the opportunity to learn from and work with a professional staff including an audio technician, costumer, business manager, lighting designer and a variety of guest artists that give the students a fundamentally diverse experience necessary to successfully pursue a variety of careers in dance and beyond.
Differentiation/accessibility strategies and support (TAG, ELL, SpEd, other):
Students can create projects outside of class that supplement and enhance classroom units (choreograph, present and perform), they may also use teacher approval of internet resources to go deeper into the content. This can be used to further analyze artistic voice and expression in today’s society.
Final proficiencies:
·To understand elements, principles and processes in dance, while developing the working knowledge of the movement vocabulary and technique of ballet dance.
·Increase knowledge and awareness of proper body alignment and body-part articulation.
·Increase stamina, strength, coordination, agility and flexibility.
·Develop an awareness of the body as an expressive tool, with attention to individual style.
·Develop original movement patterns using basic choreographic principles.
·Identify and demonstrate longer and more complex steps and patterns from two different styles or traditions.
·Demonstrate rhythmic acuity.
·Demonstrate projection while performing dance skills.
·To interpret works from various historical periods, cultures, and peoples analyzing the contexts in which they were created, the characteristics of the works, and the range of possible interpretations.
·To understand the role dance plays in society and the ways in which dance empowers people to create works that manifest their beliefs, social relationships, values and skills.
·To recognize the significance of experiences with dance and reflect on the performance and/or creation of an artistic work.
·To examine how an artistic work affects an audience, and relate audience responses to the artist’s/performer’s creative choices.
·To examine dance performances from functional and structural/formal perspectives, using defensible criteria and communicating effectively through writing, speaking and expressive media.
·To communicate conceptions of what is artistically valid or valued.
·To rehearse and publicly perform dance works in a group or as a soloist.
·To choreograph and perform a solo incorporating events that happen throughout the year.
·Learn to write a resume.
Career-related learning experiences (CRLEs):
  • Field trips
  • Guest speakers
  • Mentorships for students
Essential skills to be taught:
  • Listen actively and speak clearly
  • Think critically
  • Personal management and teamwork
  • Use technology
  • Civic and Community Engagement
Essential skills to be assessed:
  • Listen actively and speak clearly
  • Think critically
  • Personal management and teamwork
  • Use technology
  • Civic and Community Engagement
Assessment/evaluation/grading policy:
Participation, punctuality and effort = 20% of grade (a letter grade is given to each student daily) Growth of technical skill, improvement of alignment and flexibility = 50% Dance performances = 30% of grade Grading policy: A=90-100%, B=80-89%, C=70-79%, D=60-69% and F=59-00% The dance department has high standards that must be met. In order to continue your dance training in any upper level courses you must pass all prerequisite courses. Students who wish not to participate in class will have to write a report (see instructor). Extra credit will be given to those students who submit a two page typed critique of a live dance performance (see instructor).
Behavioral expectations:
Tardiness: All dance students have a five-minute dress down time before arriving to class. After five minutes students will be considered tardy. Absences: All students that arrive 15 minutes late will be marked absent. All students have three days to clear an absence. There will be no make up work for unexcused absences. Students of this caliber are expected to behave in a professional manner. They are young ambassadors not only for the dance program, but for the city of Portland. All pagers, cell phones and any other electronic devices must be turned off and stored either in your personal backpacks or in the lockers that are provided. Absolutely NO food, gum chewing, or beverages with the exception of water in a plastic bottle allowed in the dance studios. *All students are expected to behave in a respectable and professional manner. Inappropriate behavior will not be tolerated. Depending on the severity of the problem the student will receive immediate feedback. Disruptive students will be asked to leave the classroom immediately and a phone call home will be made to the parents.
Safety issues and requirements:
An environment that is safe, comfortable, and supportive, which will be conducive to the students' learning and emotional well-being.

Approved by Margaret Calvert on 9/15/2008.